50% of Americans Delay Medical, Dental Care Due to Cost

A nurse checks a patient's blood pressure at the Remote Area Medical (RAM), healthcare clinic July 25, 2008 in Wise, Virginia. The free weekend clinic, staffed by more than 1,400 vollunteer dentists, doctors and medical personel, is the largest of its kind in the nation and organizers expect more than 2,500 patients to turn out for the 2 1/2 day event. Residents of the area, most from the 'coal counties' of Appalachia, come from one of the poorest and least educated areas in the United States. Most are underinsured or have no healthcare at all, and for many the annual RAM event is the only medical treatment they may get all year. Health insurance for the disadvantaged has become one of the main issues in this year's presidential race. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Almost half of all Americans have delayed important medical or dental procedures because it would take them over 2 years to pay off ONE bill according to study.

Based on a recent study, almost 50% of Americans, that's 1 in 2 people in this country, have held off on visiting a doctor or dentist because they believed that it would be too expensive according to a recent OnePoll survey.

Denying preventative care raises the risk of having a serious emergency visit later. For instance, an average hospital visit could cost well over $12,000 and most insurance will only cover a portion of it. That's roughly $200 payments for 29 months AFTER insurance!

No wonder why many Americans put off going to a dentist or doctor! To make matters worse, most Americans don't have the money saved in order to take care of such a bill. Another problem is, it'll only be worse if you DON'T make an appointment down the line. It's a catch 22. After all, healthcare in the United States is a $4 trillion industry.

Photo: A nurse checks a patient's blood pressure at the Remote Area Medical (RAM), healthcare clinic July 25, 2008 in Wise, Virginia. The free weekend clinic, staffed by more than 1,400 volunteer dentists, doctors and medical personnel, is the largest of its kind in the nation and organizers expect more than 2,500 patients to turn out for the 2 1/2 day event. Residents of the area, most from the 'coal counties' of Appalachia, come from one of the poorest and least educated areas in the United States. Most are underinsured or have no healthcare at all, and for many the annual RAM event is the only medical treatment they may get all year. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

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