Woman Wrote Her Own Obituary and We Need to Take Moment to Read It

posted by Jimmy Nguyen -

A breast cancer patient receives a chemotherapy drip at Cape Fear Valley Medical Center June 17, 2003 in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Innovations in cancer treatment, such as more precise doses for chemotherapy drugs and high-tech radiation machines, are making the treatment of the disease more effective than ever. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

No one likes to think about their last moment on Earth. It's kind of become a taboo topic among everyone's close circle of friends or family. Those living with terminal illnesses are not fortunate to have that luxury. For Sonia Todd, who was diagnosed with a terminal form of cancer, she decided to do something rare, she wrote her own obituary.

Sometimes, it's beneficial to take a moment out of our lives to reflect and think about the greater picture in all of this. 

"My name is Sonia Todd, and I died of cancer at the age of 38. I decided to write my own obituary because they are usually written in a couple of different ways that I just don’t care for. Either, family or friends gather together, and list every minor accomplishment from cradle to grave in a timeline format, or they try and create one poetic last stanza about someone’s life that is so glowing one would think the deceased had been the living embodiment of a deity.”

"The truth, or my version of it, is this: I just tried to do the best I could. Sometimes I succeeded, most of the time I failed, but I tried. For all of my crazy comments, jokes, and complaints, I really did love people. The only thing that separates me from anyone else is the type of sin each of us participated in. I didn't always do the right thing or say the right thing and when you come to the end of your life those are the things you really regret, the small simple things that hurt other people."

"Some folks told me that writing my own obituary was morbid, but I think it is great because I get a chance to say thank you to all the people who helped me along the way. Those who loved me, assisted me, cared for me, laughed with me and taught me things so that I could have a wonderful, happy life. I was blessed beyond measure by knowing all of you. That is what made my life worthwhile.If you think of me, and would like to do something in honor of my memory do this:

- Volunteer at a school, church or library.

- Write a letter to someone and tell them how they have had a positive effect on your life.

- If you smoke - quit.

- If you drink and drive - stop.

- Turn off the electronics and take a kid out for ice cream and talk to them about their hopes and dreams.

- Forgive someone who doesn't deserve it.

- Stop at all lemonade stands run by kids and brag about their product.

- Make someone smile today if it is in your power to do so."

You can read Sonia's full obituary

Photo credit: A breast cancer patient receives a chemotherapy drip at Cape Fear Valley Medical Center June 17, 2003 in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Innovations in cancer treatment, such as more precise doses for chemotherapy drugs and high-tech radiation machines, are making the treatment of the disease more effective than ever. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

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